Seagoe Archives

January 1906

Transcript

January 1906

PRICE ONE PENNY.

Seagoe Parish Magazine

JANUARY, 1906.

LIST OF SERVICES.

HOLY COMMUNION.

On the 1st Sunday of each month after Morning Prayer, and on the 3rd Sunday of each

Month at 8 a.m.; also on the Chief Festivals of the Church.

HOLY BAPTISM.

On the 1st Saturday of each Month at 3 p m. , also at any of the Public Services of the Church

if notice be given (N .B.— Two Sponsors are required in the case of each child brought for Baptism.)

SUNDAY SERVICES.

11.30 a m, Morning Prayer ; 7 p m , Evening Prayer.

Drumgor Church Hall—2nd Sunday of each Month at 3.45 p.m

Hacknahay School—Last Sunday of Month at 3.45 p.m

WEEK DAY SERVICES.

Service is held in the Parish Church or in Edenderry Parochial Hall Thursdays at 8 p m , and

in Hacknahay School on the 2nd Thursday of each Month.

BIBLE CLASSES.

For Men every Sunday Morning at 10 a m. , in the Wooden Hall, Edenderry.

For Women every Sunday Morning at 10 a.m., in the Reading Room, Bridge Street

For Women every Sunday Morning in Seagoe School at 10 15 a.m.

For Men and Women at Carne Church Hall on Tuesday Evenings at 7.30.

SUNDAY SCHOOLS.

Edendery' Parochial Hall, 10 a.m. ; 3.30 p.m.

Seagoe School, 10 a.m. ; 3.30 p.m.

Levaghery, 3pm

Hacknahay, 3pm

Lylo (Bluestone), 3pm

Drumgor 3pm

Carne 3pm

MARRIAGES may take place in the Parish Church between the hours of 8 a.m. and 2 p m.

FUNERALS will be attended by the Parochial Clergy if due notice be given.

PORTADOWN NEWS


IMPORTANT

If yon want good APPLES, CRAPES, LEMONS

or any FRUIT IN SEASON, go to

COURTNEY'S.

HIGH STREET and EDWARD STREET.

My special Blend of 2/- TEA is equal to 2/4

sold elsewhere. A Trial Solicited.

C. COURTNEY High Street and Edward Street,

PORTADOWN.


NOTICE. WM, M 'KINSTRY & SON,

Carriage Builders,

PORTADOWN.

Every Description

of Trap or Carriage

Built, Altered or Repaired.

RUBBER TYRING

DONE ON THE PREMISES.

2/- TEA Still remains Unbeaten.

F. W. White

FLOUR,

Meal & Bran

at low prices


Select Family Grocer and Provision Merchant,

WEST STREET, PORTADOWN.

THE MOST RELIABLE HOUSE FOR

TEAS, GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS.

NO ORDER TOO LARGE, NO ORDER TOO SMALL, TO RECEIVE

PROMPT A TTENTION.


BOOKS AND STATIONERY.

All the newest and most UP-TO-DATE STATIONERY.

TOY BOOKS for Children.

BOOKS TO READ AND THINK ON.

BIBLES, PRAYER BOOKS, HYMN BOOKS.

FANCY GOODS IN VARIETY.

POCKET BOOKS & NOTE BOOKS, ACCOUNT BOOKS

& LETTER BOOKS, MAGAZINES & NEWSPAPERS

JOHN WAUGH, High street, PORTADOWN.


I beg to call the attention of my friends and customers

to my present stock of

Watches, Clocks & Jewellery

than which I have never had a larger or more varied

selection.

All Watches and Clocks are bought with great

care, and each tested under my own supervision.

For quality and cheapness they cannot be surpassed by

any house in the trade.

REPAIRS A SPECIALITY.

Some beautiful designs in Jewellery of all kinds cheap.

1 and 2 West Street,

DAVID GRAY,

PORTADOWN.

TEA! TEA! TEA!

A TRIAL OF MY FAMOUS

Special Blend at 2/- .

always ensures a Repeat Order.

CALL AND ASK FOR FREE SAMPLE.

T. J. MONTGOMERY

THE TEA HOUSE.



My Grace is sufficient for thee


Seagoe Parish magazine.

JANUARY, 1906.

CLERGY :

RECTOR —REV. JAMES E. ARCHER, B.D., The Rectory, Seagoe.

CURATE —REV. JOHN TAYLOR, B.A., Seagoe Villa.


N.B.—The Clergy will feel greatly obliged if the

Parishioners will notify to them any cases

of illness at the earliest possible moment.


Churchwardens :

MR. JOSEPH MONTGOMERY, Levaghery.

MR. JOSEPH M'MURRAY, Ballinary

Select Vestry :

ALBIN, MR. JAMES

ATKINSON, MR. W. R.

CALVERT, MR. GEORGE

COSTELLO, MR. ATKINSON

GRACEY, MR. ROBERT

IRWIN, MR, WILSON

ATKINSON, MR. W. R. , Secretary and Treasurer.

MONRO, MR. JOSEPH

MARTIN, MR. THOMAS

MONTGOMERY, MR. T. J.

McDOWELL, MR. WM. J.

ROCK, MR. DAVID

STEPHENSON, MR. JOSEPH


We start this year a new Parish Magazine

and we are very anxious that all our

Parishioners should become subscribers. The subscription for the

whole year will be ONE SHILLING

which will ensure that the subscriber

gets a copy of the Magazine each month on

publication. The charge for each separate copy of

the Magazine will be one penny.

We believe that the Magazine will prove most

useful in binding together all the Parishioners and

keeping them informed of every branch of Parochial

life. All items of Parish news will be recorded from

month to month ; also Baptisms, Marriages and

Deaths. Meetings will be announced in our columns,

and all Special Services can be made known

throughout the Parish. It is our intention also

from time to time to publish extracts from the old

records of Seagoe Parish, and it will be well worth

our readers' while to keep each copy of the Magazine

carefully, and get all bound at the end of the year.

They will thus possess a valuable record of Church

work and life in the Parish.

We wish all our people "A Very Bright and

Happy New Year."


OFFERTORIES FOR DECEMBER.

Morning Evening

£ s d £ s d

Dec. 3rd - 1st Sunday in Advent 1 1 1 7 0 15 1

0 7 2

10th - 2nd 1 4 4 0 11 8

17th - 3rd 1 3 9 0 14 8

24th - 4th 0 13 0 0 8 6

„ 25th – Christmas Day 0 9 6

1 14 0

31st—Sunday after Christmas 0 17 9 0 8 2

------------------ -------------------

£7 11 1 £2 18 1

Baptisms.

" As many of you as have been baptised into Christ, have put on Christ."

December Ist— Hester Adelaide, daughter of John and Isabella Lindsay.

December 2nd— Henry, son of John and Elizabeth Wright.

William, son of William and Mary Ann McClatchey.

Annie, daughter of John and Eliza Jane Magee.

Mabelina, daughter of Robert Henry and Margaret Ann Best.

Mary, daughter of Samuel and Mary Gracey.

Gertrude, daughter of James and Sarah Jane Reid.

December 27th—— Mary, daughter of William James and Mary Webb.


Marriages.

" Those whom God hath joined together let no man put asunder."

Dec 21st —Robert James Spence, 17 Charles Street, Portadown, to Margaret Finney, 46

Bridge Street, Edenderry.

Dec 22nd —Francis Harvey, Drumnagoon, to Agnes Laverty, Kernan.

Dec 25th—William Allen, Tagnavin, Lurgan, to Jane Gregson, Drumgor.

Deaths.

I know that my Redeemer liveth."

Nov 30th —William Simpson, Seagoe, aged 70.

Dec 12th —Isaac Dynes, Crossmacaghilly, aged 84.

Dec 13th—John Sweeney, Seagoe, aged 82.

Dec 16th —Matthew Robb, Tarson.

Dec 25th—John Graham, Drumnagoon, aged 71.


SEAGOE PARISH MAGAZINE.

MOST PEOPLE HAVE HOBBIES.

Ours are to make the BEST BREAD and CONFECTIONERY

in the Kingdom; and to Sell the BEST TEAS the World

can produce

At *2/8, *2/4, *2/- 1/10, 1/8 These marked thus * are our leading lines.

DAVISON BROS., 3 & 4 High Street, PORTADOWN.

Our Advent Services.

The special services held during Advent were very

well attended. The evening congregations especially

showed a large increase. The special preachers on

Sunday evenings were Rev. F. W. Clarendon, Rector

of Maralin ; Rev. R. S. O'Loughlin, D.D., Rector of

Lurgan . and the Rev. O. Scoff, Rector of Gilford.

The keynote of all our services during Advent was

The Church of Ireland a Missionary Church." On

each Thursday evening we had special preachers—

Rev. T. Kingsborough, Rev. Jones, and Rev. F.

J. Halahan, and the services were hearty and devotional in spirit.

These letters stand for Missionary Prayer Union an

organisation recently started to stir up missionary

interest throughout the Parish. Our good friend,

Rev. W. T. Grey, was present at the first meeting

just before he left Ireland for Japan.

We publish a letter in our columns this month from Mr. Grey,

giving a very full account of his voyage and first

experiences in that interesting country. A meeting

of the M.P.U. was held on Tuesday last in Seagoe

School. There was a good attendance of the

members, and the Advent Mission Boxes were opened

during the meeting. They contained a sum of

£2 13s 10d. A social meeting of the members will

(D.V.) take place on Tuesday, February 6th, at 7.30

p.m. We are fortunate in having as our Hon. Sec.

so capable a missionary worker as Mr. Wilson Irwin.

Men's Recreation Room,

The Room in Bridge Street is open every evening

for the men of the district. During the past quarter

some very successful gatherings have been held, and

the room is frequented by large number of men.

Much of the success of the room has been due to the

exertions of the officers—the Hon. Sec. , Mr Hugh

Stoops; the Assistant Sec., Mr. E. Holland; and

last but not least, to Mr. Wm. Sherman, the Hon.

Treas , who has brought the undertaking to a condition of complete success.

We hope shortly to greatly improve the Room, and we believe it will be,

under God's blessing, one of the most valuable of

our parochial agencies.

We have to thank our many friends for kind gifts

each week for our shooting competitions, also Miss

Armstrong for a gift of twelve chairs, and to Miss

Beattie for a form for the Women's Bible Class.


Hacknahay School.

On Wednesday evening, January 3rd, a most

successful gathering of Sunday School children and

teachers took place in Hacknahay School. The

occasion was the Annual Distribution of Prizes.

After a plentiful repast of tea and cake the Rector

(Rev. J. E. Archer) took the chair and in a few

words impressed upon all present the importance of

Sunday School work. Mr. W. J. Calvert then gave

a magnificent selection of pieces on his phonograph.

During the programme the choir, under Miss

Calvert's direction, gave some very nice sacred

selections. Mr. T. E. Maginniss read with good

effect some amusing pieces, which delighted the

young people. The prizes were then distributed by

Miss Calvert, after which the choir again sang a

hymn and then each child was presented with an

orange.

A hearty vote of thanks was given to Mr. Calvert,

who very kindly provided the entertainment at his

own expense.


Sustentation fund.

We hear good accounts of this Fund, and we hope

that every family in the Parish will give something

to it.

If you have not already subscribed send in

your subscription without delay to the Collector for

your District.


SEAGOE PARISH MAGAZINE.

Letter front Rev. W T.. Grey.

St. Andrew's House,

11 Sakae-cho,

Shiba, Tokya,

Nov. 12, 1905

To the Members of the Missionary Prayer Union, Seagoe,

My Dear Friends,

I am writing this in the hope that it

will reach Seagoe in time for your December

meeting.

It is exactly two months to-day since I helped to

form your Union, and the memory of that meeting

has often encouraged and strengthened me since.

landed in Japan on October 31st, but I only reached

Tokyo four days ago, November 8th.

I have not yet had time to form impressions of

the Japanese that would be worth recounting to you.

In my next quarterly letter I hope to tell you some-

thing about the people, customs, &c. ; I really only

write now to let you know that I have been brought

safely to the end of my long journey, to give you

some information about my present situation (I don't

use this word in the colloquial sense in which it is

used at home) and to emphasise my need of your

I enjoyed the voyage very much, tho' it was a bit

too long, and I felt glad when it came to an end.

We had practically no bad weather the whole time.

The most trying part was the heat, which for about

three weeks was intense. During that period it was

impossible to keep dry ; one was always in a state of

clamminess."

At night we slept on deck, as

remaining in our cabins was out of the question.

On Sundays we had the usual services on board—

in the 1st saloon in the morning, and in the 2nd

saloon in the evening. I acted as Chaplain on four

of the Sundays.

I had to change ship twice at Colombo and

Shanghai. At the latter place I was delayed nearly

a week before I could get a ship for Japan. This

delay, tho' unwelcomely expensive, enabled me to

see a little of the neighbourhood, and of missionary

work among the Chinese, and therefore I don't

regret it.

From Shanghai I came on by a cargo boat, as I

should have had to wait there still longer if I waited

for the next passenger ship. We called at two ports

before getting to Yokahama (which is the port for

Tokyo) viz.—Shimonoseki and Kobe. The former

is the place where the treaty was signed at the

conclusion of the war between China and Japan.

We stayed at Kobe 5 days as the ship had a very

large cargo to discharge there. One of the missionaries there, Rev. G. Nind, S.P.G , invited me to

stay with him while I remained in Kobe, and he and

his wife were exceedingly kind and made me feel

quite at home. One evening I went with him to a

missionary meeting.

It was held in a mission

room, and it was very much like one of our cottage

meetings at home. There were no chairs, of course,

—the congregation squatted on the floor. The

service opened with a hymn, then followed an

extempore prayer. After another hymn one of the

missionaries gave a short address. Then there was

some more singing, and then another missionary

spoke, and the meeting closed with prayer.

Of course I did not understand a word, but the

tunes of the hymns were familiar, and I knew what

they were singing about. They seemed intensely

earnest, and I can hardly express how I felt as I

watched those people who had been rescued from

heathendom worshipping God in a strange tongue, but

in the music that we all love. My first Sunday in

Japan was spent in

Kobe, and I preached in the

English Church.

I arrived here Wednesday night last, Nov. 8th,

and received a very warm welcome from my new

friends. One of them met me at Yokahama (which

is only about 20 miles from Tokyo) and piloted

myself and my baggage to S. Andrew's,

Our Mission House is commodious and comfort-

able, built, as most of the Japanese houses are, of

wood, but in, European style. There are at present

five of us living together, and another is expected

to join us in about a month. Perhaps you would

like to know the names of my companions. The

head is Rev. A. F. King. He is in charge of the

English services S. Andrew's Church, Tokyo ; he

is also chaplain to the St. Hilda's Mission (the

women's branch of our work), and he lectures in a

Hostel for Divinity Students which we have in

connection with S. Andrew's. Mr. King is also in

charge of the missionary work carried on in one of

the outlying country stations.

Then there is Rev. A. E. Webb, who is in

charge of Shinami-cho Mission, Tokyo, and of S.

Luke's Church in one of the city districts.

Rev. Wm. C. Gemmill is in charge of S. Andrew's

Boarding-house, in which a home is provided for

Christian young men who come up to Tokyo for

study, and in which they are kept under Christian

influences, Mr. Gemmill is also a Lecturer in one

of the Government Universities here.

Rev. W. H. Mockridge is in charge of a Church at

Mita, another district in the city.

I feel sure I shall like my fellow-workers, as

indeed I do already. They all seem extremely good,

earnest men, and they have extended to me a real

brotherly welcome. We have three Japanese clergy-

men working with us, but as they are married men

with families they live in houses of their own. One

of them is the Head-master of our Boys' School.

Another is Principal of the Hostel for Divinity

Students, and the third is in charge of the Japanese

Services in S. Andrew's Church.

I have not seen much of these yet, but I hear great things about

them.

There is one point about this Mission that I have

been greatly struck with, and that is the emphasis

that is laid upon the value of intercessory prayer.

Every step that is taken is taken in the power of

prayer, all that is done is sanctified by prayer.

Every morning the members of the Mission meet

together in our little Church at 7 0'clock and spend

the first hour of the day in prayer.

Again at noon we join in intercessions with God

that His Blessing may rest upon us and others.

And once more we meet together for the same

purpose before retiring to rest.

Tokyo is a huge city. If you were to walk across

it from one side to the other you would have to walk

about 7 or 8 miles; the population is, I hear, considerably

over 1 ½ millions. There are many fine

side streets, but most of the streets are very

narrow, lined with small wooden houses, chiefly

shops.

There is a splendid service of electric trams

running through the main thoroughfares, but the

general method of locomotion is the Rickshaw."

I have begun to learn the language, which I am

told is one of the most difficult in the world. I

shall, however, be able to do a little in English, so

that I shan't be altogether dumb till my Japanese

tongue is loosed. I have already addressed a meeting

of Japanese students who understand English.

Remember that I am depending on your prayers.

Think of yourselves as Foreign Missionaries

stationed at home. By earnest prayer for me and

my work here (as your representative) you can do as

real work for Japan as I can on the spot. When

you are on your knees praying for India or Japan,

you are really in a true sense spending so much time

in those countries, and doing real work in them.

And now I must say good bye to you, and may

God bless you all. I wish you all a very happy

Christmas, and when you are experiencing the happiness

of that sacred season think of those who as

yet know nothing of Christmas joy.

I remain,

Yours in our Blessed Lord,

WM. T. GREY.


Our Advertisers.

We direct the special attention of our readers to

the advertisements in our Magazine. We hope that

as far as possible they will patronise those who have

helped forward our efforts by inserting advertisements.

Girls' Friendly Society.

The Edenderry branch of this Society meets in

the Parochial Hall every Monday evg., at 8 0'clock,

under the charge of the Misses Atkinson. Bible Classes

conducted by the Rector and the Rev. J. Taylor,

meet on alternate Mondays—once every fortnight.

We are glad to hear that the Drumgor branch is

doing so well ; it meets once a fortnight on Monday

evenings. The members of the Hacknahay branch

will assemble in Edenderry, on Saturday, January

6th, and every second Saturday following, at 3.

The classes for candidates will be held by Miss

Connor at the Parochial Hall at the same hour, and

on the same days.

We want all the members to attend the meetings

regularly, and get others to join. The Misses

Dawson, who are so much missed in the Parish,

have taken up G.F.S. work in Belfast. Their

labours for the benefit of the G.F.S. in Seagoe will

not soon be forgotten.


The Magazine.

The Parish Magazine is on sale at Mrs. Malcomson's,

News Agent, Bridge Street, where copies of

this number may be had—ld each.


Notes on Old Seagoe.

The old Irish name of Seagoe Parish was Tydba,

which means in Irish the house of Gobhan."

Seagoe is a corruption of the Latin name Sedes

Gobhani."


The present Parish Church was built in 1816, and

the old church in the graveyard ceased to be used

from that time.


The bridge at Edenderry was built in the year

1837 and cost £9,000. It was built on dry ground

and the river was diverted to flow under it.


There were only 12 houses in Edenderry in 1837,


One of the oldest Bells in Ireland is the Cloch-

Bann or Bell of Seagoe, which is preserved in a

glass-case in the Royal Irish Academy Museum,

Kildare Street, Dublin. It dates from A.D. 907.

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Seagoe Archives

In March 2019 this website was launched by Seagoe Parish. It contains digital access to the earliest editions of the parish magazines from 1905 until 1935. This project was supported by Heritage Lottery Fund. Magazines from 1936 are being uploaded.

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